Use of Quantitative Ultrasound to Guide Adaptive Chemotherapy Among Women With Breast Cancer

Official Title

A Phase 2 Study of Quantitative Ultrasound to Guide Adaptive Chemotherapy Among Women With Breast Cancer

Summary:

The primary objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of randomizing breast cancer patients to quantitative ultrasound to guide adaptive Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy as compared to standard clinical monitoring and therapy. The Investigators have previously demonstrated that high-frequency ultrasound and spectroscopy, and recently conventional-frequency ultrasound and spectroscopy may be used to detect cell death in vitro, in situ and in vivo. The method can detect different forms of cell death and has been demonstrated to be sensitive to apoptotic, necrotic and mitotic cell death. By detecting cell death early in a treatment on the order of hours to days, rather than traditional anatomical assessments that take place weeks to months after the completion of therapy, ineffective therapies could be switched to more efficacious treatments or aggressive salvage therapy which has shown to already benefit patients. The overarching goal of this research is to transform the delivery of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using quantitative ultrasound (QUS), which is non-invasive, inexpensive and portable.

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Measuring the rate of treatment response between the treatment groups

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

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Resources

Canadian Cancer Society

These resources are provided in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society